Sixth Form Courses - September 2021 

We offer a wide range of A Level subjects, plus selected complimentary Level 3 BTEC courses, but one of the key reasons students choose to study with us is the personalised support that students miss in a larger college. Our dedicated Sixth Form Team are there to make sure that students remain on track both academically and emotionally

Entry Requirements

The leap from Key Stage 4 to 5 is a challenging one. therefore we require all applicants to our Sixth Form to have obtained the following minimum grades in order to be offered a place:

  • A Levels - at least 5 GCSEs at grade 5 or above, including English and Mathematics
  • BTECs - at least 5 GCSE’s at grade 4 or above including English and Mathematics

Selected subjects may also require a higher grade in that particular subject.

Course Guides - September 2022

  • Biology A Level (OCR)

    Course Information (OCR syllabus)

    Admission to the course is dependent on achieving a minimum of 5 GCSEs grades 9 – 5 including English and Maths at grade 5. Grade 66 in Combined Science or Grade 6 in Biology.

    Year 1 Study

    Students will cover 4 modules of work during the course of the year.

    Module 1 is the development of practical skills in biology. This covers the planning, implementing, analysing and evaluation of practical procedures throughout the biology course.

    Module 2 examines the foundations of biology and covers cell structure, biological molecules, nucleotides and nucleic acids, enzymes, biological membranes and cell division, cell diversity and cellular organisation.

    Module 3 looks at exchange surfaces and transport in animals and plants.

    Module 4 covers biodiversity, evolution and disease. We examine communicable diseases, prevention, the immune system, biodiversity, classification and evolution.

    Year 2 Study

    Students will further their biological knowledge by completing 2 further modules of work.

    Module 5 looks at communication within the body, homeostasis, neural and hormonal communications, and plant and animal responses before concluding with photosynthesis and respiration.

    Module 6 looks at cellular control, patterns of inheritance, how we manipulate genomes and how ecosystems function.

    Assessment

    Throughout the course, students will be assessed at the end of each topic to monitor progress, as well as through assessment of significant pieces of work. These assessments do not count towards the final grade. There will also be internal assessments at the start of the course and at the end of year 12.  At the end of year 13, students sit 3 papers. The first is Biological Processes which assesses modules 1, 2, 3 and 5 and the second is Biological Diversity which assesses modules 1, 2, 4 and 

    6. Each of these papers is worth 37% of the final examination grade. The third paper, worth 26% of the total A level, is Unified Biology and will ask questions from all content. There is also a Practical Endorsement in Biology which will be reported separately to the A level grade, where students keep a lab book of practical experiences over the 2 years of the course. In total, there are 12 practical areas that students need to have covered.

    Teaching and Learning Styles Biology is investigative by nature. Students will develop their practical skills as well as developing their analytical and thinking skills. They will be expected to communicate well both orally and in their written work, producing creative presentations of their understanding of the biology involved. There are also a significant amount of mathematical skills required.

     

    Independent Study

    Independent work is encouraged and promoted. Students must read up on content before the lesson and then use time after the lesson to complete work, for example, revision materials to further their understanding of the topic. Students would be expected to spend an average of 6 hours per week on independent study

     

    Future Pathways

    Biology, like all the sciences, is a facilitating subject, one that many universities require students to have to get onto many degree courses. The A Level Biology A course will prepare learners for progression to undergraduate study, enabling them to enter a range of academic and vocational careers in biological sciences, medicine and biomedical sciences, veterinary science, agriculture and related sectors. For learners wishing to follow an apprenticeship route or those seeking direct entry into biological science careers, this A level provides a strong background and progression pathway.

  • Art & Design A Level (AQA)

    Course Overview AQA syllabus)

    This is a two year fine art course that develops traditional skills and an understanding of the contemporary art world.

    Course Requirements

    5 GCSEs graded 9 – 4 including English and Maths. Grade 4 in an Art & Design related subject is required.

    Year 1

    The first year is a foundation course in which all art skills are taught. Teacher led projects are integral to this.

    Students then work on a range of final pieces covering the areas of drawing, painting, sculpture, digital imagery and printmaking. Students make contextual links to their work through looking at artists from a range of historical periods and also contemporary work.

    The development of knowledge is supported by visits to galleries, museums and other locations designed to inspire creativity.

     

    This year is an opportunity for students to experiment with techniques and ideas and to take creative risks.

     

    Year 2

    In year  two students complete two assessed units of work.

    Component 1: Personal Investigation

    This is a practical investigation supported by written material.

    Component 2: Externally set assignment

    Students select one question as a starting point for a practical piece of work. Students then produce preparatory work leading to 15 hours of unaided work in supervised conditions.

    How will I be assessed

     

    Component 1: Students will develop work for a personal investigation into an issue, concept or theme. This will count for 60% of the total marks.

     

    Component 2: Students will produce personal work in response to one of eight starting points. This will count for 40% of the total marks.

     

    Independent Study

     

    Art is a practical course in which you learn by doing, so students will be able to create imaginative personal work. Students will find out about a whole range of media, techniques and processes. Students will also develop their creativity and independent thought. Students will learn to express themselves visually and let their imagination flourish. This will largely take place in independent study time.

     

    Progression

    Students will acquire skills, knowledge and understanding required for higher education.

  • Photography A Level (AQA)

    Course Overview (AQA syllabus)

    Students will be introduced to a variety of experiences that explore a range of photographic media, techniques and processes. They will be made aware of both traditional and new technologies. Students will explore relevant images, artefacts and resources relating to a range of art, craft and design, from the past and from recent times, including European and non-European examples. This is integral to the investigating and making processes. Students’ responses to these examples will be shown through practical and critical activities that demonstrate their understanding of different styles, genres and traditions. Students will be able to use traditional methods and/or digital techniques to produce images. Students will be made aware of the four assessment objectives to be demonstrated in the context of the content and skills presented and of the importance of process as well as product.

     

    Course Requirements

     

    5 GCSEs graded 9 – 4 including English and Maths at grade 4.

    Grade 4 in Art & Design related subject required.

    Year 1

    Until Summer Term: Students will be given a comprehensive introduction to photography. This includes an introduction to concepts and technical skills in photography. They will explore the work of key practitioners and be introduced to important historical trends. They will develop a broad understanding of photographic technology. They will develop their ability to research and analyse independently, important examples of photography from its origins to the present time.

     

    Summer Term onwards:

    Students will undertake The Personal Investigation coursework. They will choose a theme or area of practice that interests them and begin to conduct strategic research. They will experiment with making independent responses, developing stronger ideas over time and refining and developing their work. This process will continue into Year 13 to ensure creative, fully developed ideas and explorations.

    Year 2

    Term 1:

    Students will continue to develop their Personal Investigation coursework, resolving outcomes related to their research and considering various display strategies. They will also complete the accompanying critical study essay.

    Until May:

    Students will undertake the Externally Set Task, independently selecting a question from the exam board set questions. They will prepare research and explorations around their chosen question using the assessment objectives to guide their working process and complete a final response in a 15 hour controlled assessment. An external examiner will visit the school in June to see an exhibition of students’ work and to moderate the marks assessed by the teacher.

     

    Assessment Information

    60% Controlled Assessment 40% Externally set assessment

     

    Future Pathways

    The qualification provides students with the opportunity to build a portfolio necessary for Art and/or Design degree courses or Art Foundation course.

  • Fashion & Textiles A Level (AQA)

    Course Overview (AQA syllabus)

    Students will be introduced to a variety of experiences that explore a range of textile skills, techniques and processes. They will be made aware of both traditional and new technologies. They will explore relevant images, artefacts and resources relating to a range of art, craft and design, from the past and from recent times, this is integral to the investigating and making processes. Students’ responses to these examples will be shown through practical and critical activities that demonstrate their understanding of different styles, genres and traditions.

    Using sketchbooks/workbooks/journals to underpin their work, students will develop their drawing skills in order to produce storyboards, thumbnail sketches and/or diagrams, where appropriate. They will produce responses to these examples which will be shown through practical and critical activities.

    Students will be made aware of the four assessment objectives to be demonstrated through both the process and final product.

     

    Course Requirement

    5 GCSEs graded 9 – 4 including English and Maths at grade 4. Grade 4 in Art & Design related subject required. For those who have not previously studied this subject they  will have a further interview and may need to produce a portfolio.

     

    Year 1

    Students will be given a comprehensive introduction to fashion and textiles. This includes an introduction to concepts and skills in fashion and textiles. They will explore the work of key practitioners and be introduced to important historical trends. They will develop a broad understanding of fashion and textiles from starting point to end products. They develop their ability to research and analyse independently, experiment with ideas and media and produce final designs and fashion/textile outcomes. 

    Students will undertake The Personal Investigation coursework. They will choose a theme or area of practice that interests them and begin to conduct strategic research. They will experiment with making independent responses, developing stronger ideas over time and refining and developing their work. This process will continue into Year 13 to ensure creative, fully developed ideas and exploration.

     

    Year 2

    Students will continue to develop their Personal Investigation course, resolving outcomes related to their research and considering various display strategies. They will also complete the accompanying critical study essay.

    Students will undertake the Externally Set Task, independently selecting a question from the exam board set questions. They will prepare research and explorations around their chosen question using the assessment objectives to guide their working process and complete a final response in a 15 hour controlled assessment. An external examiner will visit the school in June to see an exhibition of students’ work and to moderate the marks assessed by the teacher.

     

    Assessment Information

    60% Controlled Assessment

    40% Externally set assessment

     

    Future Pathways

    The qualification provides students with the opportunity to build a portfolio necessary for Art and/ or Design degree courses or Art Foundation course.

  • Business A Level (Exexcel)

    Course Information (Edexcel syllabus)

    Course Specification: 9BSO

    The Pearson Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in Business is structured into four themes and consists of three externally examined papers.

    Students are introduced to business in Themes 1 and 2 through building knowledge of core business concepts and applying them to business contexts to develop a broad understanding of how businesses work. Breadth and depth of knowledge and understanding, with applications to a wider range of contexts and more complex business information, are developed in Themes 3 and 4, requiring students to take a more strategic view of business opportunities and issues.

    Students are encouraged to use an enquiring, critical and thoughtful approach to the study of business, to understand that business behaviour can be studied from a range of perspectives and to challenge assumptions.

    Course Requirements

    5 GCSEs graded 9 – 5 including Maths at grade 5.

    Grade 6 in English required.

    Year 1 Study

    Theme 1 Marketing and People

    Theme 2 Managing Business Activity

    Year 2 Study

    Theme 3 Business Decisions and Strategy

    Theme 4 Global Business

    Assessment Information

    Students will be writing an externally set exam at the end of the two year programme for A-level. This will include Paper 1 (Marketing, People and the Global Business-Theme 1 & 4) - 35% of the total qualification

     

    Paper 2 (Business Activities, Decisions and strategy-Theme 2 & 3) - 35% of the total qualification

     

    Paper 3 (Investigating Business in a competitive Environment- assess content across the four themes) - 30% of the total qualification.

    Teaching and Learning Styles

    There will be variety of teaching and learning styles such as group discussion, case study analysis, independent & group research, presentation, role play, mini projects, independent learning, class discussion with varied class and exam practice activities, student-led teaching and out-of-school learning activities. Students are also given homework as a form of extended learning to strengthen their understanding of a taught topic and also encourage independent learning.

     

    Independent Study

    Students will be required to take responsibility for their independent learning, which will take many forms such as research; private study, completion of homework and extra study time to extend their learning, which requires good time management.

  • Cambridge Technical Level 3 Performing Arts (OCR)

    Course Specification: Cambridge Technical Level 3

    Course Overview (OCR)

    A 2 year Performing Arts course that explores a wide variety of styles and genres, responding to performance briefs and real life scenarios about working in the performing arts industry.

     

    Course requirements

    5 GCSEs grades 9 – 4 including English and Maths at grade 4. If Drama was not studied at GCSE – students will be required to attend an audition.

     

    Units of Study

    Prepare to Work in the Performing Arts Sector

    You will learn about the jobs and organisations that make up the industry, how it is funded and how companies are supported and regulated. The unit will give you strategies, attitudes and survival skills for sustaining a career in the performing arts industry. You will learn to self-promote and respond to current employment opportunities as well as learning when and how to adapt to a quickly changing economic landscape.

     

    Proposal for a Commissioning Brief

    This unit will equip you with the range of skills to be able to set out proposals as a response to a given brief and then set up and pilot performances and/or workshops. It will also provide you with a set of transferable skills that will underpin freelance work in your chosen artistic field.

     

    Influential Performance Practice

    You will learn about genres, styles and periods, social, cultural and historical influences and significant theatrical/performance developments and practitioners. You will become familiar with a range of different styles and periods, e.g. Classical, Modern and Postmodern, within their social, cultural and historical contexts and will be able to select, adapt and apply elements of your research into your performance concept and practical performance.

    Combined Arts

    Some contemporary performance companies do not want to be categorised. These companies don't want to be solely defined as 'theatre' or 'dance' companies, but would prefer to be known for the barriers they cross and for the integrated nature of the work that they do.

    Your research into the history of new performance and influential artistic practice will reveal a long history of actors, dancers and musicians extending their skills into other forms and beginning new creative movements and styles.

    You may be an actor, dancer or a musician, work with masks or puppets, be a mime artist or musical theatre performer; in this unit, you will be able to find innovative and dynamic ways of combining these to reimagine the existing piece and making it accessible and fresh for a contemporary audience.

     

    Music and Musical Theatre | University of Chichester

     

    Improvisation

    This unit allows you to explore and develop the creative skill of improvisation and understand its place in the development process of performance. It will help you to extend your technical vocabulary and increase your ability to analyse and evaluate. You will begin to understand the demands and rewards of such work through a combination of research, practical workshops, rehearsals, reflection and refinement.

    Complicite - The Noise of Time

     

    How will I be assessed?

    All the units are either internally assessed and externally moderated or externally assessed.

    You will complete a variety of portfolios, research tasks, presentations and performances over the 2 years.

     

    Independent Study

    You will be expected to complete research, learn lines and attend extra rehearsals throughout the course. It is also advisable that you try to independently watch live theatre performances in a variety of genres. 

     

    Progression

    The course is great preparation for any Drama or Performing Arts degree. It is also an excellent platform for finding work within the music or creative arts industry. The great thing about Cambridge Technical qualifications is that they still give you a choice of opportunities once you have completed them. 

  • Chemistry A Level (OCR)

    Course Requirements

    5 GCSEs graded 9 – 5 including English. A minimum of grade 6 in Maths.

    Grade 66 in Combined Science or Grade 6 in Chemistry required.

    Course Information (OCR)                         Course Specification: H432

     

    Year 1 Study

    In the first year of the A level students will study topics which build and extends GCSE knowledge from the following 4 areas: 

    Module 1 – Development of Practical Skills in chemistry looks at the practical skills throughout year 12 and year 13. 

    Module 2 – Foundations of Chemistry begins with atoms, compounds molecules and equations before going onto looking at how we can calculate the amount of a substance, acid-base and redox reactions finally ending with electrons, bonding and structure. 

    Module 3 – Periodic table and Energy covers the periodic table and periodicity, group 2 and the halogens, qualitative analysis, enthalpy changes and reaction rates and equilibrium from a qualitative perspective. 

    Module 4 – Core Organic Chemistry looks at hydrocarbons, alcohols and haloalkanes, organic synthesis and analytical techniques. 

    Year 2 Study

    In the second year of the A level students continue their study into chemistry – module 1 continues to develop their practical skills, whilst they study two more units:

     

    Module 5 – Physical Chemistry and Transition Elements looks at a quantitative approach to reaction rates and equilibrium, pH and buffers, enthalpy, entropy and free energy, redox and electrode potentials and transition elements. 

     

    Module 6 – Organic Chemistry and Analysis examines further organic chemistry to cover aromatic compounds, carbonyl, carboxylic acids and ester, nitrogen compounds, polymers, organic synthesis and chromatography and spectroscopy.   

    Assessment

    Throughout the course, students will be assessed at the end of each topic to monitor progress, as well as through assessment of significant pieces of work. These assessments do not count towards the final grade. There will also be internal assessments at the start of the course and at the end of 

    is called Periodic Table, Elements and Physical Chemistry which assesses modules 1, 2, 3 and 5 and the second is called Synthesis and Analytical Techniques which assesses modules 1, 2, 4 and 6. Each of these papers is worth 37% of the final examination grade. The third paper, Unified Chemistry, is worth 26% of the total A level and will ask questions from all content. There is also a Practical Endorsement in Chemistry which will be reported separately to the A level grade, where students keep a lab book of practical experiences over the 2 years of the course. In total, there are 12 practical areas that students need to have covered.

    Teaching and Learning Styles

    The chemistry course will be highly practical in nature, it will involve group and individual work and practice of exam questions for consolidation of concepts. The mathematical requirements of the course are challenging with at least 20% of assessment marks being for mathematical skills

    Independent Study

    Independent work is encouraged and promoted. Students must read up on content before the lesson and then use time after the lesson to complete work, for example, revision materials to further their understanding of the topic. Students would be expected to spend an average of 6 hours per week on independent study. Students will have access to an online textbook and resources through our Sixth Form learning resource, Kerboodle.

    Future Pathways

    Chemistry, like all the sciences, is a facilitating subject, one that many universities require students to have to get onto many degree courses. The A Level Chemistry course will prepare learners for progression to undergraduate courses in chemistry, biochemistry, medicine, dentistry, engineering, pharmacy or one of the other sciences or related subjects. For learners wishing to follow an apprenticeship route or those seeking direct entry into chemical science careers, this A level provides a strong background and progression pathway.

  • Core Maths (Edexcel)

    What is Core Maths?

    Core Maths is an umbrella term for a specific type of level 3 maths qualification. A Core Maths course can be taken alongside A levels and vocational qualifications. It’s equal in size to an AS level qualification and carries the same number of UCAS tariff points, up to 20 points.

    Why should I study Core Maths?

    It can improve your results

    Many other subjects studied after GCSE include mathematical content. Maths skills are included in the assessment of around a third of all non-maths A levels. For example, 10% of the marks in A level Psychology assess maths skills. Many level 3 vocational courses, such as engineering, applied science, sociology, business studies, H&S care include a lot of maths. If you study maths alongside subjects like these you’ll achieve better results in them.

    It develops useful skills

    Studying maths develops your numeracy, graphical and problem-solving skills. These skills are really useful preparation for the maths used in many university degree courses, higher apprenticeships, and the workplace. It can also increase your confidence and fluency in the maths used in everyday life.

    It opens up opportunities

    Maths beyond GCSE is highly regarded by employers and universities. They are often required or recommended, and may lead to reduced offers for entry to university and degree apprenticeship programmes, even for subjects that don't have a large amount of mathematical content.

     

    It keeps your maths skills fresh

    The chances are that at some point you’ll be asked to take a numeracy test. Many university courses, including subjects other than maths, such as medicine and teaching, require applicants to take an additional admission test with some mathematical content. Many employers use numeracy tests to filter applicants. Students who have studied maths beyond GCSE are likely to be better prepared for such tests.

     Course Requirements

     Minimum of grade 4 at GCSE Mathematics (Foundation or Higher).

    Who is Core Maths for?

    Core Maths is designed for students who’ve achieved a grade 4 or above in GCSE Mathematics, but don’t intend to take AS/A level Mathematics. It’s particularly valuable for any student planning a future that requires good quantitative and statistical skills, whether that’s in higher education or employment.

    What you will study

    You’ll learn some new topics, but it mostly involves maths you’ll have already used for your GCSE. Where it differs is its focus on developing the skills you need to apply maths to the kinds of real-life problems you’ll meet in study, work and life.

     

    Assessment Information

    Core Maths is assessed entirely by exam for which you will take two written papers – so there is no coursework.

     

    What will I get at the end of the course?

    At the end of the two-year course, you will be awarded a Pearson Level 3 Certificate in Mathematics in Context – similar to AS qualification.

    Independent Study  

    Students are expected to complete an hour of independent study for every hour that is taught.  

     

    Future/Career Pathways

    Business, Sciences, Psychology, Health and Social Care, Technical Careers such as engineering, Construction, Sports Science, Geography and many more.  

     

  • English Literature A Level (Edexcel)

    Course Information (Edexcel)

    Course Specification : 8ETO / 9ETO

    The aims and objectives are to enable students to:

    • Read widely and independently set texts and others that they have selected for themselves.
    • Engage critically and creatively with a substantial body of texts and ways of responding to them.
    • Develop and effectively apply their knowledge of literary analysis and evaluation.
    • Explore the contexts of the texts they are reading and others’ interpretations of them.
    • Undertake independent and sustained studies to deepen their appreciation and understanding of English literature, including its changing traditions.

    Course Requirements

    5 GCSEs graded 9 – 5 including at Maths grade 5 and English Literature at grade 6.

    Year 1

    Students will cover 2 units: Component 1 (Poetry and Drama)

    and Component 2 (Prose).

    In C1 students will study a selection of poems from a published poetry text. Students will also study aspects of the form of drama via one play.

    In C2 students will study aspects of prose via two thematically linked texts, at least one of which must be pre-1900.

    Year 2

    Students will cover 3 units: Component 1 (Drama), Component 2 (Prose) and Component 3 (Poetry).

    In C1 students will study aspects of the form of drama via one play as well as revising the play from the previous year. Students study a tragedy or comedy drama by Shakespeare and revise the other tragedy or comedy drama.

    In C2 students will revise aspects of prose via two thematically linked texts previously studied in year 1, at least one of which must be pre-1900.

    In C3 students will study a selection of poems from two published poetry texts, one of which is studied in year 1. Students will apply their knowledge in comparing an unseen poem with an example of studied poetry.

    Students will also develop depth of knowledge by studying a selection from the work of a single named poet, or a selection from within a literary period or movement.

    Assessment

    Students will take an assessment at the end of each topic to monitor progress; these do not count towards the final grade.

    In year 2 students revise topics studied and assessed in year 1 as well as 1 additional text in C1 and C3. They also complete one extended comparative essay referring to two texts. Total advisory word count: 2500–3000. Coursework will be assessed via two texts. There are no prescribed texts but students must select different texts from those studied in Components 1, 2 and 3.

    The selected texts may be linked by theme, movement, author or period.

    Teaching and Learning Styles

    As part of the study of their selected Shakespeare play, students will engage with different interpretations. To support this, students will be provided with either the Shakespeare: A Critical Anthology: Tragedy or Shakespeare: A Critical Anthology: Comedy. Each critical anthology includes four generic essays and three specific essays on each set text to encourage students to engage with different readings of their studied Shakespeare play. Literary study of the chosen set poems will be enhanced by study of the contexts in which they were written and received. Independent Study

    Students will engage in wider reading, use independent reading skills and apply research and study skills to their chosen literature.

  • Extended Project (EPQ) (AQA)

    Course Code: 7993

    Course Information (AQA)

    The EPQ is a Level Three Qualification which is graded A* to E. It is an excellent opportunity to develop your skills of independent research and to undertake a highly respected qualification which is valued by both employers and universities.  

     

    Course Requirements

    Students should have at least 5 GCSEs graded 9 - 5 including English and Maths and can demonstrate clear motivation and enthusiasm for enrolling onto the EPQ programme.

     

    The EPQ Process

    The EPQ is your chance to undertake an independent research project on a topic of your choice. You can choose to present your final product in the form of a 5,000-word essay or an artefact, which could range from a portrait, a performance or an experiment. In your EPQ sessions you will carry out research in discussion with your supervisor and complete your project. You will present your project to an audience of peers and submit your full Production Log for moderation and submission to AQA.

     

    Assessment Information

    You will be assessed through the completion of your product and the submission of your Production Log which will be marked and moderated by the school and then sent to AQA for assessment. You will be expected to carry out extensive research and meet regularly with your supervisor to discuss your progress. At the end of the project you will present your work to your peers at a presentation evening which counts towards your overall assessment.

     

    Teaching and Learning

    You will have 30 hours of Taught Skills Sessions where you will learn the skills necessary for the successful completion of the EPQ. You will learn how to undertake effective research, how to manage your time and how to reference your research and how to present it. The rest of the time, you will be encouraged to undertake independent research that helps develop your project, with the help of your supervisor.

    Transferable Skills

    Students that successfully complete the EPQ demonstrate that they are capable of coping with the academic demands of further study at University. The EPQ also enables students to develop transferable skills such as public speaking, independent research, time management and critical thinking which are highly valued at University and in the workplace.

  • French A Level (Edexcel)

    Course Overview (Edexcel)                Course Specification:  7652

    The course covers the development of francophone culture, literature and cinema, focusing particularly on recent changes in family and youth life, the media and the impact of immigration. There is a separate historical focus on the effects of the Second World War on France in terms of occupation, collaboration and the resistance movement.

    Throughout their studies, students will learn the language in the context of French-speaking countries.

     

    Course Requirement

    5 GCSEs graded 9 – 5 including English and Maths at grade 5. Grade 6 in French required.

     

    Year 1

    Students study the changing nature of French society, including families, art and music and media as well as the films Les Intouchables and La Haine.

     

    Year 2

    Students study how immigration affects France and the French speaking world, how France was impacted by the Second World War and the book Les Petits Enfants du Siecle.

     

    Teaching and Learning styles

    Students will develop the skills in listening, reading, speaking and writing using a range of audio, literary and video resources.

    In addition there will be regular grammar sessions (both explicit and in context of current topics).

     

    Independent Study

    Students will be required to undertake 6 hours per week of independent study to support class learning: this will be logged in their student folders and regularly checked.

     

    Assessment Information

    The assessment is formed of three papers:

    Paper 1: Listening, reading and writing

    Written exam

    40% of A-level

     

    Paper 2: Response to texts and translation

    Written exam

    30% of A-level

     

    Paper 3: Speaking

    Oral exam

    30% of A-level

     

    Future Pathways

    French has been identified by the Russell Group of top universities as a facilitating subject, meaning that it prepares students for the most challenging academic study. In turn, high level academic qualifications give the most choice in the job market. Many employers value the ability speak and communicate in a foreign language – a skill that is becoming ever rarer.

     

  • Further Maths A Level (Edexcel)

    Course Requirement (Edexcel)                                     Exam Board: Edexcel - 8FM0/9FM0

     Admission to the course is dependent on achieving a minimum of 5 GCSEs graded 9 – 5 including English and Maths at grade 7.

     

    Course Content

    Students are required to develop skills in working scientifically over the course of this qualification. The course has three over - arching themes

     

    Overarching theme 1: Mathematical argument, language and proof

     

    Knowledge/Skill

    • Construct and present mathematical arguments through appropriate use of diagrams; sketching graphs; logical deduction; precise statements involving correct use of symbols and connecting language, including constant, coefficient, expression, equation, function, identity, index, term, variable
    • Understand and use mathematical language and syntax
    • Understand and use language and symbols associated with set theory
    • Understand and use the definition of a function; domain and range of functions
    • Comprehend and critique mathematical arguments, proofs and justifications of methods and formulae, including those relating to applications of mathematics

     

    Overarching theme 2: Mathematical problem solving

     

    Knowledge/Skill

    • Recognise the underlying mathematical structure in a situation and simplify and abstract appropriately to enable problems to be solved
    • Construct extended arguments to solve problems presented in an unstructured form, including problems in context
    • Interpret and communicate solutions in the context of the original problem
    • Understand the concept of a mathematical problem solving cycle, including specifying the problem,
    • collecting information, processing and representing information and interpreting results, which may identify the need to repeat the cycle
    • Understand, interpret and extract information from diagrams and construct mathematical diagrams to solve problems
    •  

      Overarching theme 3: Mathematical modelling

       

      Knowledge/Skill

    • Translate a situation in context into a mathematical model, making assumptions
    • Use a mathematical model with suitable inputs to engage with and explore situations (for a given model or a model constructed or selected by the student)
    • Interpret the outputs of a mathematical model in the context of the original situation (for a given model or a model constructed or selected by the student)
    • Understand that a mathematical model can be refined by considering its outputs and simplifying assumptions; evaluate whether the model is appropriate
    • Understand and use modelling assumptions
    •  

       Assessments

      The Advanced GCE in Further Mathematics consists of four externally examined papers. Students must complete all assessments in May/June in any single year.

      Independent Study

      Students are expected to complete an hour of independent study for every hour that is taught

      Future Pathways

      Further Mathematics is highly regarded and is warmly welcomed by universities. Students who take Further Mathematics are really demonstrating a strong commitment to their studies, as well as learning mathematics that is very useful for any mathematically rich degree. Some prestigious university courses require you to have a Further Mathematics qualification and others may adjust their grade requirements more favourably to students with Further Mathematics.

  • Geography A Level (Edexcel)

    Course Overview    (Edexcel)                 Course Specification: 9GE0

    The A-Level course will build on GCSE content but allows students more freedom to focus on the topics and current affairs that they are most interested in.

     

    Fieldwork is a compulsory part of the A-Level course.

     

    To succeed in Geography, Students must be able to interlink all the topics. The exams are based on skills, rather than on content.

    Course Requirement

    5 GCSEs graded 9 – 5

    Maths at grade 5

    English at grade 5.

    Geography at grade 6

    Year 1

    You will complete the following topics for the examination component in Year 13:

     

    • Area of study 1, Topic 1: Tectonic Processes and Hazards
    • Area of study 2, Topic 3: Globalisation
    • Area of study 1, Topic 2: Landscape Systems, Processes and Change & Coastal Landscapes
    • Area of study 2, Topic 4: Shaping Places & Regenerating Places

    In addition, you will complete your first attempt at the independent study (a 4000-word project, for which you set and answer your own hypothesis).

    Year 2

    You will complete the following topics for the examination component in Year 13:

     

    • Area of study 3, Topic 5: The Water Cycle and Water Insecurity
    • Area of study 4, Topic 7: Superpowers
    • Area of study 3, Topic 6: The Carbon Cycle and Energy Security
    • Area of study 4, Topic 8: Global Development and Connections & Health, Human Rights and Intervention

    You will also complete a second independent study. This is submitted to Edexcel as your fieldwork investigation.

    Assessment Information

    There are three exams:

    1. Physical geography: 2:15 minutes, 30% of the        A-Level
    2. Human geography: 2:15 minutes, 30% of the         A-Level
    3. Synoptic Themes: 2:15 minutes, 20% of the            A-Level

     

    You hand in ONE 4000-word independent investigation. This is worth 20% of the A-Level.

    Future Pathways

    Geography is a well-respected ‘traditional’ academic discipline that enables you to use a variety of skills (literacy, numeracy, practical fieldwork, research, report writing, etc.).

    Any University course, or career, linked to the environment would need geographical experience. Examples could include: transport management, meteorology, urban planning, surveying, resource management, tourism, forestry, overseas development, aid agencies, financial services and commodities. The possibilities are almost endless.

    Geography will also stand you in good stead for other careers like teaching, journalism, and local / national government.

  • Health & Social Care BTEC Level 3 m(Edexcel)

    Course Requirements (Edexcel syllabus)

    Course Specification: BTEC National Level 3 Extended Certificate

    Grade Merit or higher in Level 2 Health and Social Care or 5 GCSE grade 4 or above including English and Mathematics.

     

    Year 1

    Unit 1 - Human lifespan development – Written exam externally marked – Learners cover physical, intellectual, emotional and social development across the human lifespan and the factors affecting development and the effects of aging.

    Unit 5 – Meeting Individual Care and Support Needs – assignment set (internally assessed) – Learners focus on the principles and practicalities that underpin meeting individuals care and support needs.

    Year 2

    Unit 2 – Working in Health and Social Care – Written exam externally  marked  –  Learners  explore  what  it  is  like  to work in the Health and Social Care sector, including roles and responsibilities of workers and organisations.

    Unit 14 – Physiological disorders and their care. – assignment set (internally assessed) – Learners will explore different types of physiological disorders, how they are diagnosed and the types of appropriate treatment and the support that service users may encounter.

     

     

    Assessment Information

    2 written exams – externally assessed/marked, plus 2 internally set tasks (coursework assignments) – internally assessed.

     

    Future Pathways

    Career in the health and social care sector – for example – midwife, nurse, paramedic, teacher, police officer, nursery assistant, day care assistant etc.

    Entry to Higher Education – for example - degree in nursing, midwifery, teaching etc.

  • History A Level (AQA)

    Course Overview (AQA)                              Course Specification : 7042        

    A-level History help students understand the significance of historical events, the role of individuals in history and the nature of change over time. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the past through political, social, economic and cultural perspectives. The engaging topics available to them throughout the course will provide them with the knowledge and skills they require to succeed as historians.

     

    Course Requirements

    5 GCSEs graded 9 – 5 including Maths at grade 5 and English at grade 6.Grade 6 in History required.

    Year 1

     

    Unit 1F: Industrialisation and the People: Britain, c.1783-1832 •     The Pressure for Change, c.1783-1812

    •     Government and a Changing Society, 1812-1832

     

    Unit 1F: The Age of Reform: Britain, 1832-1885
    •     Political Change and Social Reform, 1832-46

    •     Economy, Society and Politics, 1846-1885

     

    Historical Investigation: Reform and Revolution in Czarist Russia, 1815-1917

    This unit involves a 100 year historical enquiry in the form of a 4000 word source-based piece of coursework. The background work will be taught in Year 12 with the coursework submitted in Year 13.

    This unit focuses on the causes of and the historiography surrounding the February Revolution of 1917. Specifically students will be asked to evaluate the key factors leading to the fall of the Romanovs in 1917.

    Year 2

    Unit 2T: The Crisis of Communism: the USSR, 1953-2000

    •      De-Stalinisation, 1953-1964

    •      Stagnation, 1964-1985

    •      The Gorbachev Revolution, 1985-2000

    Unit 2T: The Crisis of Communism: the Soviet Empire, 1953- 2000

    •      Soviet Satellites, 1953-68

    •      ‘Real existing Socialism’, 1968-1980

    •      The Collapse of the Soviet Empire, 1980-2000

     

    Assessment

    Year 12

    The course is linear but there will be a Mock exam in the Autumn as well as the Summer term of Year 12.

     

    Year 13

    Unit 1F (Breadth Study) and Unit 2 (Depth Study) are both assessed by written exams of 2 hour 30 minutes. For each of these papers, 3 questions must be answered (including one compulsory question on each paper). Each paper is worth 80 marks and constitutes 40% of the overall A-level.

    The Historical Investigation is worth 40 marks and 20% of the A-level. This is marked by the teaching staff and moderated by AQA.

     

    Additional Information

    The full details of all units studied will be given to all students – as will the ‘weighting’ accorded to each unit. Reading lists and past paper questions will also provide crucial support for students.

  • Maths A Level (Edexcel)

    Exam Board: Edexcel - 8MA0/9MA0

    Why should I study the course?

    A level Mathematics deepens your understanding of the natural world. We go from statistical analysis to predicting outcomes – statistics. We model real life, practical scenarios and calculate results – mechanics. Also crucially, abstracting concepts from theoretical problems, which develop algebraic ability through pure mathematics.

    The course gives you the techniques required for other science-based disciplines as well as a solid foundation for future mathematics based careers.

     

    Course Requirements

     Minimum of grade 6 at GCSE Mathematics.

     

    What you will study

    You will study Pure Mathematics (67%) alongside Statistics and Mechanics (33%). This will lead to an A Level Mathematics qualification at the end of Year 13. All the content is compulsory, and requires the use of a scientific calculator. 

     

    Pure Mathematics

    Similar to the content of the Core 1 to 4 of the old specification, the new specification (2017) specification Pure Maths consists of Algebra, Functions, Sequences and Series, Proof, Coordinate Geometry, Trigonometry, Exponentials and Logarithms, Differentiation and Integration, Vectors and Numerical Methods.

     

    Statistics

    You will be studying statistical sampling, data presentations and interpretation using such statistical diagrams as histograms, scatter graphs and calculations as mean, variance, standard deviation, quartiles and percentiles; and statistical distributions as normal and binomial distributions. There is also new content on hypothesis testing.

     

    Mechanics

    The mechanics content involves the study of motion of objects including displacement, velocity, acceleration, forces, Newton’s Laws and moments of force. 

     

    Assessment Information

     You will be assessed by means of three 2-hour papers, each worth 100 marks at the end of the 2-year course. All three papers will be taken in May/June of the same year. Paper 1 and 2 cover all AS and A Level in no particular order. Paper 3 is the applied paper (Statistics and Mechanics).

     

    Teaching and Learning Styles

     The main body of knowledge and skills will be taught through teacher-led sessions. In addition, students will be given a range of challenging enrichment activities and encouraged to share their knowledge and skills with the class and to support each other in their learning.

     

    Independent Study  

    Students are expected to complete an hour of independent study for every hour that is taught.  

     

    Future/Career Pathways

    Accountancy, Engineering, Medicine, Pharmacy, Actuarial Sciences, Psychology, Chemistry, Astronomy, Economics, Management Studies, Computer Science, Architecture, Law and many more.

  • Music A Level (EDUQAS)

    Course Overview

    The course gives you a holistic understanding of music, allowing you to investigate, analyse and evaluate music and its features. It helps you learn to perform, compose and appreciate different types of music, develop critical thinking and creative thinking, cultural, aesthetic and emotional awareness, and the ability to make music individually and as part of a group.

     

    Course requirements

    5 GCSEs graded 9 – 5 including English and Maths at grade 5. Grade 6 in Music GCSE or Grade 5 in any instrument or theory from ABRSM or Trinity Guildhall Music.

    Year 1

    Students will develop their performance, compositional and appraising skills in their first year of study.

    Students  will develop their solo performance and ensemble performance skills through working towards a 6 minute performance recital in front of a live audience. They will also develop performing skills to demonstrate an understanding of musical elements, style, sense of continuity, interpretation and expression.

    Students will also develop their composing skills to demonstrate the manipulation of musical ideas and the use of melodic devices and conventions. Students will be taught how to use music technology to enhance their compositional skills and will use Logic Pro X and Sibelius software.

    Students will develop their appraising skills through appraising contrasting genres, styles and traditions of music, and developing understanding of musical contexts and a coherent awareness of musical chronology.

    Year 2

    Students will continue to develop their performance, compositional and appraising skills in their second year, building towards their final assessments for A Level.

    Students will learn and develop key instrumental/vocal techniques, with an emphasis on the interpretation of musical ideas and technical control.

    Students will also study a range of compositional techniques and how to compose for differing groups of instruments. They will also learn how to compose to a brief assessing compositional techniques such as harmonising a Bach chorale, completing a two part counterpoint, composing an arrangement or composing a remix.

    Students will continue to develop their appraising skills through the study of music across a variety of styles and genres. This unit will focus on preparation for their exam and will focus on reflecting on, analysing and evaluating music in aural or written form.

    Assessment

    Students will be assessed over 3 key musical areas: Performing (35%), Composing (25%) and Appraising (40%). Students can perform either as a soloist, as part of an ensemble, by improvising, or realising music using music technology. Students will take part in a recital in front of a live audience and will have to perform for a minimum of 8 minutes. Students may perform music in any musical genre/style.
     

    Composing (25%)

    Students will compose a total of 2 compositions, one set to a brief by WJEC and one either free composition or also to a brief. One composition must be either a free composition or from a list of briefs set by WJEC relating to the areas of study. This composition must be at least 4 minutes in duration and is worth 40 marks. The other composition must be from a list of briefs assessing compositional technique and is worth 20 marks. This must be at least 1 minute in length. The total time across both submissions must be a minimum of 6 minutes.
     

     

    Appraising (40%)

    Students will sit a written paper of 2 hours, with a total of 100 marks. The paper comprises 2 sections:

    Section A: Areas of study and dictation (50 marks)

    Section B: Extended response essay questions (50 marks)

    Independent Study

    Students will have to work independently by practicing on their chosen instruments, attending instrumental lessons and performing in recitals. Students will also need to develop their independent learning skills through listening to a wide variety of unfamiliar music and analysing this music.

  • Physics A Level (OCR)

    Syllabus: OCR

    Course Specification: H156/H55

    Course Requirements

    5 GCSEs graded 9 – 5 including English at grade 5 and Maths at grade 6.

    Grade 66 in Combined Science or Grade 6 in Physics required.

     

    Year 1

    Students will cover 4 modules of work during the course of the year, split between 2 teachers. Module 1 is the development of practical skills in Physics. This will cover planning, implementing, analysing and evaluation of practical procedures from throughout the Physics  course.  Module  2  covers  the  foundations of Physics: the nature of quantities,  how we make measurements  and  analyse  data.  Module  3  looks  at  forces and motion, including looking at Newton’s laws of motion and momentum. Module 4 covers electrons, waves and photons. In this final module, we examine charge and current, energy, power and resistance, electrical circuits, waves and quantum physics.

     

    Year 2

    Students who continue to the second year of study build on their knowledge of Physics by completing 2 further modules of work. Module 5 looks at the Newtonian world and astrophysics, looking at thermal physics, circular motion, gravitational fields and the cosmology. Module 6 covers particles and medical physics: medical imaging, capacitors, electric fields and electromagnetism before looking at nuclear and particle physics.

     

    Assessment

    Throughout the course, students will take assessments at the end of each topic to monitor progress, as well as through assessment of significant pieces of work. These assessments do not count towards the final grade. There will also be internal assessments at the start of the course and at the end of year 12. At the end of year 13, students sit 3 papers.

    Paper 1: Modelling Physics, content from modules 1, 2, 3 and 5. 37% of grade.

    Paper 2: Exploring Physics content from modules 1, 2, 4 and 6. 37% of grade.

    Paper 3: Unified Physics. This will examine content from the whole specification. 26% of grade.

     

    There is also a Practical Endorsement in Physics which will be reported separately to the A level grade, where students keep a lab book of practical experiences over the 2 years of the course. In total, there are 12 practical areas that students need to have covered.

     

    Teaching and Learning Styles

    Physics, like all sciences, is investigative by its nature. It is also the most mathematical of the sciences, with 40% of the final grade being assessment of mathematics. There will be opportunities for students to develop their practical skills as well as developing their  analytical  and  thinking  skills.  Students  will  be  expected to communicate well both orally and in their written work, producing creative presentations of their understanding of the biology involved.

     

    Independent Study

    Independent work is encouraged and promoted. Students must read up on content before the lesson and then use time after the lesson to complete work, for example, revision materials to further their understanding of the topic. Students would be expected to spend an average of 6 hours per week on independent study. Students will have access to an online textbook and resources through our Sixth Form learning resource, Kerboodle.

     

    Future Pathways

    Physics, like all the sciences, is a facilitating subject, one that many universities require students to have to get onto many degree courses. The A Level Physics course will prepare learners for progression to undergraduate study, enabling them to enter a range of academic and vocational careers in mathematics-related courses, physical sciences, engineering, medicine, computing and related sectors. For learners wishing to follow an apprenticeship route or those seeking direct entry into physical science careers, this A level provides a strong background and progression pathway.

  • Politics A Level (AQA)

    Syllabus: AQA

    Course Specification : 7152

    Course Overview

    Politics enables students to develop their critical thinking skills and enhance their ability to interpret, evaluate and comment on the nature of politics. In Year 12 students will concentrate on Britain politics (Paper 1) and will begin a comparative study of the politics of the USA (Paper 2). In Year 13 we finish the American politics unit and then undertake a course in Ideologies (Paper 3), looking at the big ideas of modern politics.   

    Course Requirements

    5 GCSEs grade 9–5 including Maths at grade 5 and English at grade 6 or History at grade 6.

    Year 1

    Unit 1:   Government and Politics of the UK

    • The British Constitution
    • Parliament
    • The Executive
    • The Supreme Court
    • Devolution
    • Democracy and participation
    • Elections and voting
    • Political parties
    • The European Union

    Unit 2: The Government of the USA and comparative politics (Part I)

    • The Constitution of the USA
    • The Legislature: Congress

    Year 2

    Unit 2: The Government of the USA and comparative politics (Part II)

    • The Executive: the Presidency
    • The Judiciary: the Supreme Court
    • Democracy and participation
    • Civil Rights

    Unit 3: Political Ideologies

    • Liberalism
    • Conservatism
    • Socialism
    • Nationalism

    Assessment

    Year 12

    The course is linear but there will be a Mock exam in the summer term of Year 12.

    Year 13

    Each unit is assessed by a written exam of 2 hours – a mixture of medium length ‘explain’ and essay type questions. Each paper is worth 77 marks. Each of the 3 papers is worth one third of the A-level.

    Additional Information

    It is envisaged that the course would be supported by ongoing liaison with the House of Commons Education Department and the United States Embassy; guided trips to Parliament and regular workshops with guest speakers – members of pressure groups, pollsters and journalists. A working holiday to Washington D.C. would also be a (long term aspirational) element of the Year 13 Syllabus.

  • Psychology A Level (AQA)

    Syllabus: AQA

    Course Specification : 7181/7182

    Course Overview

    Psychology questions the way we think about our world and behaviour, so ask yourself this question: Are you ready to question the way we behave?

    Psychology is a science and therefore you will need to study research and evidence objectively. There is also a high demand for a good biological understanding and core mathematics skills.

    Psychology enables you to question human behaviour and therefore is a great subject for those wanting to work in Healthcare professions, teaching, law and business.

     

    Course Requirements

    5 GCSEs graded 9 – 5 including Maths at grade 5 and English at grade 6.

     

    Year 1

    A-Level students can choose from a range of attractive topic options ensuring that they experience an interesting, diverse and coherent course of study.

    Topics are taught through a variety of approaches and methods related to the core areas of Psychology – cognitive, social, biological, developmental, individual differences and research methods, explanations from different approaches, along with psychological issues and debates:

    • Social influence
    • Memory
    • Attachment
    • Approaches in Psychology
    • Psychopathology
    • Research methods

    Year 2

    • Gender
    • Schizophrenia
    • Forensic Psychology
    • Research Methods
    • Assessment Information

      Assessments employ a variety of types of question such as multiple choice, short answer and extended writing/essays, which target the skills of knowledge and understanding, application and evaluation. Students’ understanding of research methods are gained through classroom experience of practical Psychology and will be assessed using the familiar scenario-based question style and research methods questions embedded in topics.

       

      External assessments are taken at the end of the two year course in the following way:

       

      Paper 1 – Introductory topics in Psychology: 96 marks, 2 hours

       

      Paper 2 – Psychology in context: 96 marks, 2 hours

       

      Paper 3 – Issues and Options in Psychology: 96 marks, 2 hours

  • Sociology (AQA)

    Syllabus: AQA

    Course Specification: 7191/7192

    Course Overview

    The course includes a range of attractive topics ensuring that students experience an interesting, diverse and coherent course of study looking at approaches and methods related to the core areas of Sociology, enabling students to engage in theoretical debate and to encourage an active involvement with the research process.

     

    Course Requirements

    5 GCSE’s grades 9 – 5 including Maths at grade 5 and English at grade 6.

     

    Year 1

    • Education
    • Education in the context of research methods
    • Research Methods
    • Families and Households

    Year 2

    •      Crime and Deviance

    •      Theory and Methods

    •      Media

     

    Assessment Information

    Students are assessed with a variety of familiar question types, including short answer and extended writing/ essays, which target knowledge and understanding; application and analysis; and evaluation.  Students’ understanding of research methods, gained through classroom experience of practical Sociology, will be assessed using the familiar methods in context format.

     

    External assessment is at the end of the 2 year course in the following papers:

     

    Paper 1 Education with Theory and Methods

    Paper 2 Families and Households

    Paper 3 Crime and deviance with Theory and Methods

     

    Teaching and Learning Styles

    If you want answers to the inequalities of power and wealth in society choose Sociology. If you want to understand how and why society has changed choose Sociology. If you want to question how we make progress choose Sociology.

     

    You will need to have good literacy skills and an ability to write extended essay style answers.

     

  • Spanish A Level (AQA)

    Syllabus: AQA

    Course Specification:  7652

    Course Overview

    Students study technological and social change, looking at diversity and the benefits it brings. They will study highlights of Spanish-speaking artistic culture, including music and cinema, and learn about political engagement and who wields political power in the Spanish-speaking world.  Students also explore the influence of the past on present-day Spanish-speaking communities. Throughout their studies, they will learn the language in the context of Spanish-speaking countries.

     

    Course Requirement

    5 GCSEs graded 9 – 5 including English and Maths at grade 5.

    Grade 6 in Spanish required.

     

    Year 1

    Students will learn about social trends, artistic culture, as well as study the film ‘El Laberinto del Fauno’.

    Year 2

    Students will learn about social issues and political culture, as well as study the book “La Casa de Bernarda Alba”.

     

    Teaching and Learning Styles

    Students will develop the four linguistic skills of listening, reading, speaking and writing via a range of audio, visual and kinaesthetic activities.

    They will have access to a range of resources, including digital online resources, authentic spoken and written texts (books, novels, clips from TV, film and radio).

    In addition there will be regular grammar sessions (both explicit and in context of current topics).

     

    Independent Study

    Students will be required to undertake 6 hours per week of independent study to support class learning: this will be logged in their student folders and regularly checked.

    Assessment Information

    The assessment is formed of three papers:

    Paper 1: Listening, reading and writing. Written exam. 50% of A-level

    Paper 2: Writing. Written exam. 20% of A-level

    Paper 3: Speaking. Oral exam. 30% of A-level

     

    Future Pathways

    Adding a language to your degree will give you the competitive edge to pursue jobs in the global arena. Doing this degree means you can immerse yourself in the Spanish language and culture while gaining skills in your choice of subject, such as English Literature, Film or Journalism. This would also suit students who want to work abroad or in an international domain. Teaching is also a route many people studying a language decide to take.

  • BTEC Level 3 National Diploma in Sport (Edexcel)

    Year 1/2 Study

    Students are required to complete 6 mandatory units and 3 optional unit throughout the course. This course is equivalent in size to two A Levels. Three are externally assessed and six are internally assessed.

    Unit 1 Anatomy and Physiology

    Unit 2 Fitness Training and Programming for Health, Sport and Well-being

    Unit 3 Professional Development in the Sports Industry

    Unit 4 Sports Leadership

    Unit 6 Sports Psychology

    Unit 7 Practical Sports Performance

    Unit 17 Sports Injury Management

    Unit 22 Investigating Business in Sport and the Active Leisure Industry

    Unit 23 Skills Acquisition in Sport

     

    Course Information

    5 GCSEs graded 9 – 4 including English and Maths at grade 4. Admission is also dependent on a minimum grade of 4 or above in GCSE PE or a Merit at BTEC Level 2.

    A sporting background is advantageous as students should have an interest in sport and need to be motivated and organized to meet the demands of the coursework assignments and the end of year exam.

    Assessment

    Internally assessed coursework tasks are linked to the criteria produced by Edexcel. Each assessment is completed under specified conditions, then marked with the grade awarded.

     

    An external assessment is taken in year one to assess learners in their knowledge of anatomy and physiology. The exam will contribute to 11% of the overall grade in year one. In year 2, students will complete two externally assessed set tasks. This will be marked by examiners at Pearson and again will contribute to 22% of the overall grade in year two.

    Internal Assessment; learners are assessed using a variety of assessment styles to develop a broad range of transferable skills. Learners could be given opportunities to:

     

    • Write up the findings of their own research projects
    • Use case studies to explore complex areas of the syllabus
    • Carry out projects and create presentations
    • Demonstrate practical and technical skills.

     

    Teaching and Learning Styles

    Students are required to have a keen interest in sport. Some specialist units require extensive critical annotation and analysis so good literacy skills are essential. Students will receive some vocational experiences, hands on practical tuition and will be supported when completing coursework tasks.

    Students will have the opportunity to meet with potential employers and will get support in applying for sports related jobs. BTEC Sport students will be encouraged and supported to participate in the schools Silver Duke of Edinburgh Programme to develop navigation and camp craft skills. The award will also develop a range of valuable competencies such as teamwork, leadership and creative thinking.

     

    Independent Study

    To access the higher grades, students will be required to undertake independent study and show commitment and flair for the subject.

    The school have a range of links and partnerships with local sports clubs and support students in obtaining work experience particularly in leadership and coaching roles. We are currently working with Kent County Cricket, Charlton Athletic Community Trust, Charlton Park RFU, The Greenwich Titans and many more organisations.

    Students will have access to the active book online resource which allows students to view and amend material from the BTEC Level 3 text book in an interactive way. This resource should be accessed and worked from at school and at home.

  • BTEC Level 3 National Extended Certificate in Sport

    Syllabus: Edexcel

    Course Specification:

    BTEC level 3 National Extended Certificate in Sport – TRL70

    Year 1/2 Study

    Students are required to complete 3 mandatory units and 1 optional unit throughout the course. Two are externally assessed and two are internally assessed.

    Unit 1 Anatomy and Physiology

    Unit 2 Fitness Training and Programming for Health, Sport and Well-being

    Unit 3 Professional Development in the Sports Industry

    Unit 7 Practical Sports Performance

    Course Information

    5 GCSEs graded 9 – 4 including English and Maths at grade 4. Admission is also dependent on a minimum grade of 4 or above in GCSE PE or a Merit at BTEC Level 2.

     

    A sporting background is advantageous as students should have an interest in sport and need to be motivated and organized to meet the demands of the coursework assignments and the end of year exam.

    Assessment

    Internally assessed coursework tasks are linked to the criteria produced by Edexcel. Each assessment is completed under specified conditions, then marked with the grade awarded.

     

    An external assessment is taken in year one to assess learners in their knowledge of anatomy and physiology. The exam will contribute to 25% of the overall grade in year one. In year 2, students will complete an externally assessed set task. This will be marked by examiners at Pearson and again will contribute to 25% of the overall grade in year two.

    Internal Assessment; learners are assessed using a variety of assessment styles to develop a broad range of transferable skills. Learners could be given opportunities to:

    • Write up the findings of their own research projects
    • Use case studies to explore complex areas of the syllabus
    • Carry out projects and create presentations
    • Demonstrate practical and technical skills.

    Teaching and Learning Styles

    Students are required to have a keen interest in sport. Some specialist units require extensive critical annotation and analysis so good literacy skills are essential. Students will receive some vocational experiences, hands on practical tuition and will be supported when completing coursework tasks.

    Students will have the opportunity to meet with potential employers and will get support in applying for sports related jobs. BTEC Sport students will be encouraged and supported to participate in the schools Silver Duke of Edinburgh Programme to develop navigation and camp craft skills. The award will also develop a range of valuable competencies such as teamwork, leadership and creative thinking.

     

    Independent Study

    To access the higher grades, students will be required to undertake independent study and show commitment and flair for the subject.

    The school have a range of links and partnerships with local sports clubs and support students in obtaining work experience particularly in leadership and coaching roles. We are currently working with Kent County Cricket, Charlton Athletic Community Trust, Charlton Park RFU, The Greenwich Titans and many more organisations.

    Students will have access to the active book online resource which allows students to view and amend material from the BTEC Level 3 text book in an interactive way. This resource should be accessed and worked from at school and at home.

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Registered address: United Learning, Worldwide House, Thorpe Wood, Peterborough, PE3 6SB. Tel: 01832 864 444

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